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Message 11 in thread
From: SIOL (info@noo-spam.com)
Subject: Re: USB chips - MCU flavoured
 
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Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Date: 2003-03-06 03:01:14 PST
I'm trying to use UDA1325 from Phillips, but I can't get the I2C driver to install properly in Windows.

Its a nice little chip also.



"Garrett Mace" <g.ryan@macetech.com> wrote in message news:v6doot1pecsg39@corp.supernews.com...
> >
> > try
> > http://www.dontronics.com/dlp.html
> > http://www.dontronics.com/giga.html
> > for starters
> >
>
> Might work better/cheaper just to use a USB micro to start out with.
>
> The MC68HC908JB8 is a low-speed, USB 1.1 uC. Digi-Key sells them for about
> $5 in quantity of one. This is for a flash chip, the OTP are probably a bit
> cheaper (though Digi-Key doesn't have them).
>
> I've used the 28 pin SOIC version. All you need is the chip, a crystal, some
> resistors, a couple capacitors, and a USB plug. Toss on a MAX232 and five
> jumpers, and you can easily program the chip in-circuit. PEmicro.com has
> some great IDE and programmer tools available for download.
>
> Digi-Key also has the 20-DIP package of this. I've never used it, but it
> certainly looks like an easy way to get USB onto even a Radio Shack
> protoboard or breadboard. You lose a few bits of I/O (which I needed) but
> certainly a handy little chip.
>
> I have two JB8 boards sitting on my desk now; one professional dev board
> from Elektronikladen, and one board I designed which also includes a USB
> hub.
>
> I already have Windows software and assembly methods to transfer a few bytes
> to and from the controller, using the HID-class protocol. I'll be willing to
> help if someone decides to go the JB8 route.
>
> Remember that if you want to sell a USB device, prepare for a lengthy
> verification process and shelling out a couple grand to get a vendor ID.
>
>
Message 12 in thread
From: craig (craig-beiferman@attbi.com)
Subject: Re: USB chips - MCU flavoured
 
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Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Date: 2003-03-06 15:46:48 PST
I used the FT245BM from FTDI.
There is no verification process, as its already done, and FTDI gives you
free
drivers. I was up and running over USB in exactly 5 minutes after I built my
first prototype.

I couldn't believe how easy FTDI made it to talk over USB.

-Craig Beiferman





"SIOL" <info@noo-spam.com> wrote in message
news:YTF9a.1977$wK6.87597@news.siol.net...
> I'm trying to use UDA1325 from Phillips, but I can't get the I2C driver to install properly in Windows.
>
> Its a nice little chip also.
>
>
>
> "Garrett Mace" <g.ryan@macetech.com> wrote in message news:v6doot1pecsg39@corp.supernews.com...
> > >
> > > try
> > > http://www.dontronics.com/dlp.html
> > > http://www.dontronics.com/giga.html
> > > for starters
> > >
> >
> > Might work better/cheaper just to use a USB micro to start out with.
> >
> > The MC68HC908JB8 is a low-speed, USB 1.1 uC. Digi-Key sells them for about
> > $5 in quantity of one. This is for a flash chip, the OTP are probably a bit
> > cheaper (though Digi-Key doesn't have them).
> >
> > I've used the 28 pin SOIC version. All you need is the chip, a crystal, some
> > resistors, a couple capacitors, and a USB plug. Toss on a MAX232 and five
> > jumpers, and you can easily program the chip in-circuit. PEmicro.com has
> > some great IDE and programmer tools available for download.
> >
> > Digi-Key also has the 20-DIP package of this. I've never used it, but it
> > certainly looks like an easy way to get USB onto even a Radio Shack

Read the rest of this message... (22 more lines)

Message 13 in thread
From: SIOL (info@noo-spam.com)
Subject: Re: USB chips - MCU flavoured
 
View this article only
Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Date: 2003-03-07 00:29:43 PST

"craig" <craig-beiferman@attbi.com> wrote in message news:I5R9a.381541$be.351147@rwcrnsc53...
> I used the FT245BM from FTDI.
> There is no verification process, as its already done, and FTDI gives you
> free
> drivers. I was up and running over USB in exactly 5 minutes after I built my
> first prototype.
>
> I couldn't believe how easy FTDI made it to talk over USB.

Does it have on-board DAC?

Siol
Message 14 in thread
From: JQP (suta@888.nu)
Subject: Re: USB chips - MCU flavoured
 
View this article only
Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Date: 2003-03-07 07:41:07 PST
"Garrett Mace" <g.ryan@macetech.com> wrote in message
news:v6doot1pecsg39@corp.supernews.com...
> I have two JB8 boards sitting on my desk now; one professional dev board
> from Elektronikladen, and one board I designed which also includes a USB
> hub.

What chip did you use for the hub?

> I already have Windows software and assembly methods to transfer a few
> bytes to and from the controller, using the HID-class protocol. I'll be willing to
> help if someone decides to go the JB8 route.

That's a generous offer but probably the best way to help would be to
provide more details on the JB8 design that is on your web site.
Message 15 in thread
From: Garrett Mace (g.ryan@macetech.com)
Subject: Re: USB chips - MCU flavoured
 
View this article only
Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
Date: 2003-03-07 13:23:11 PST
> > I have two JB8 boards sitting on my desk now; one professional dev board
> > from Elektronikladen, and one board I designed which also includes a USB
> > hub.
> 
> What chip did you use for the hub?

TUSB2046, Texas Instruments 4-port USB hub controller. And a TPS2074,
Texas Instruments USB hub power controller. The schematics to make a
USB hub are in the datasheets for those parts. Very easy to use (if
you don't mind hand-soldering QFP and TSSOP parts). TI sent them to me
for free. Later on they called to see what I needed them for..."And
what is your expected market for these devices?" "Two million." Hey,
that's what we determined when we did the market study. Got official
market projections for webcam purchasers, and figured 1 in 10 would
consider buying our accessory. That was optimistic 1999 market
projections though.

> > I already have Windows software and assembly methods to transfer a few
> > bytes to and from the controller, using the HID-class protocol. I'll be willing to
> > help if someone decides to go the JB8 route.
> 
> That's a generous offer but probably the best way to help would be to
> provide more details on the JB8 design that is on your web site.

I would, but that might be premature. Basically, there is not a lot to
the electronics. Build a hub circuit similar to what the datasheet
shows, put an oscillator and random pullup resistors on the
MC68HC908JB8, and run one of the hub ports to the JB8. The harder part
is designing the PCB. I have a complete PCB design, but there are a
few bugs I'd have to iron out before I release the drawings. I've run
into a few things while constructing the board, so any updates will
happen after I've gotten the PCB design to my satisfaction.

The only other main thing is the code. Currently it's left at the
point I finished it a year ago: result of weeks poring over assembly
and Visual Studio. I think it came out pretty well, considering I
never had any classes in assembly or C++. I can tell that it's not
very pretty, and need to clean it up before anyone will ever see it.

Since there really isn't literature out there dealing with the JB8,
I'm not aware of anyone else who can share information about this
chip. I'm sure it's in many consumer devices.

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